Skill #16: Using Cognitive Science to Make Your Technical Writing More Interesting

Anne Janzer—author of Writing to Be Understood—shares how technical writers can make their technical writing more interesting. We discuss where technical writers may currently miss the mark in their writing, how technical writers can use cognitive science to make their writing more interesting, and small steps technical writers can take today to begin applying the concepts.

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Skill #15: Transitioning into Instructional Design

Katie Price, instructional designer at Azusa university, on the podcast to share with us how technical writers can transition into instructional design, including what types of projects instructional designers work on, what skills you need to learn to excel in instructional design, and how to use your existing skills to transition into the field.

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Skill #14: Contributing to Open Source Projects

Kyle Taylor—Solutions Architect at FFW and President of a Denton-based technology nonprofit TechMill—shares with how you can contribute to open source projects, including how to choose the right project to contribute to, how to translate your contributions into your portfolio, and how to create open source documentation that developers will love.

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Best of 2016

2016 was a lovely year for The Not-Boring Tech Writer podcast. We had 10 episodes with 11 guests, covering a variety of topics that truly captured the theme of the podcast: how technical writers can break the stereotype that technical writing is a boring career.

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Skill #4: Understanding UX Design

Understanding how your users experience your documentation is understanding UX design – which can make or break your docs’ usability. As our guest and UX designer Autumn Hood describes it: “You can’t have good technical communication without good UX design.”

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Skill #1: Applying Empathy to Your Audience Analysis

Once you’ve found your end-user, think about how you find his or her truest needs for the product or service. For many technical writers, it looks something like this: compile a series of  fairly generic questions – “how old are you?”, “how familiar are you with the technology?” – and hope their responses unveil their needs.

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